Those Big Metal Pyramids

I read recently that those big metal pyramids (the Producers Cooperative Oil Mill, which processed cotton and oil seed) south of downtown Oklahoma City are going to be torn down soon. I got my information from “The Lost Ogle,” so I might need to be cautious about taking it seriously. Regardless, it seemed as ifContinue reading “Those Big Metal Pyramids”

West of Fort Smith

Oklahomans of the 21st Century, if they think about it at all, might like to imagine a location within the state’s borders as its birthplace: perhaps the Three Forks region near Muskogee, where fur traders headquartered in the early 1800s, or Purcell, the southern border of the April 1889 land run. Or there’s Guthrie, theContinue reading “West of Fort Smith”

Five Historic Places in Oklahoma You’ve Probably Never Seen (But Should)

The history of Oklahoma didn’t begin with statehood in 1907 or even with the Land Run of 1889. Early inhabitants left plenty of archaeological evidence of their presence, but except for the well known Spiro Mounds Historic Site, you can’t get to those places and even if you could there might be nothing to see.Continue reading “Five Historic Places in Oklahoma You’ve Probably Never Seen (But Should)”

La Miel: The “Honey River”

One of my favorite experiences from our recent trip to Colombia was the time we spent at La Cachaza Hotel Ecologico on Rio La Miel, the “Honey River.” La Miel is a tributary of Rio Magdalena, Colombia’s largest river. To reach La Cachaza, we crossed the river by ferry, drove along a narrow dirt road,Continue reading “La Miel: The “Honey River””