Raindrops on Roses

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One of the images from my rainy day photo expedition with Mark. We headed out on foot without rain gear and had to take cover on a neighbor’s porch when it began to rain with vigor. Big surprise! Bill came to the rescue and picked us up so we took advantage of the rain to photographs items around the house. These are some of the roses in my front garden.

DSCF0405Here’s more:

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Curves and Hollows

View from a crevice in Hideout Hollow
View from a crevice in Hideout Hollow

We call the Ozarks “mountains,” and so they seem. But the area – covering northwest and north central Arkansas and much of southern Missouri — is really a high plateau deeply cut by rivers and creeks. This world of hollows and knobs is traversed on twisting roads and trails edged by sheer drops and breathtaking beauty. In late spring, the deep green of the dense forest colors even the air. Clear streams run out of fern-lined crevices and over bluffs, drawing the hiker with their burbling. It was this place we chose to spend our 10th Anniversary, and a good decision it was.

Tim Ernst leads our group of students across a meadow at Steel Creek Campground
Tim Ernst leads our group of students across a meadow at Steel Creek Campground

Part of our rationale was the opportunity to attend a photography workshop with Tim Ernst (www.timernst.com), hiking legend, author, and renowned nature photographer. The workshop would take place on May 2 near the Buffalo National River. I found a cabin close by and booked it for a few extra days so we could make a longer getaway of the trip. Cove Creek Cabin (http://www.buffaloriverchamber.com/cove_creek_cabin.html) is located near Compton in an isolated spot on the edge of the national park.

We stopped at the “Morgan Lodge” near Garfield, Arkansas for a night’s stay on our drive over and enjoyed the wonderful hospitality. I got up early the next morning and shot photos of the columbines on the bluff.

Columbine on the bluff at the
Columbine on the bluff at the “Morgan Lodge”

Thursday, April 30, 2015

It was an easy drive east to the Upper Buffalo area. We traveled through Eureka Springs and stopped in Berryville for lunch at the Ozark Café. It is located on the town square and had the appearance of one of those iconic small town restaurants with the best food around. It lived up to its appearance. The dark but cozy interior was filled with locals, the food was good and the service was friendly. The best part was the homemade peanut butter fried pie with ice cream. Peanut butter fried pie? Yes. It was amazing.

We arrived at Cove Creek Cabin (several miles off the highway on a dirt road) mid-day and relaxed for a while. I even took a nap on the breezy back porch running the length of the house and read a little in Tortillas and Totems by Sam Manicom (www.sam-manicom.com). Later in the afternoon we decided to get out for a hike. From Tim Ernst’s Arkansas Hiking Trails guidebook we knew that the trailhead for Hideout Hollow was less than a mile from our cabin, so that seemed like a good choice for a hike late in the day.

Falls at the head of Hideout Hollow
Falls at the head of Hideout Hollow

The Hideout Hollow trail is a round trip of two miles but we managed to make a little over 2 ½ miles of it. This trail is not well known and we saw no other hikers as we walked along the rocky hillside into the hollow. At .8 miles we came out on top of a tall bluff with great views of the valley.

Overlook on Hideout Hollow Trail
Overlook on Hideout Hollow Trail

Eventually we reached the head of the creek and found a lovely waterfall. The flow of water wasn’t heavy, but enough to make it a pretty sight.

Bill surveys the hollow
Bill surveys the hollow

Exploring downstream a bit, Bill spied a spot where we could scramble over the ledge and into the depths of the hollow. Descending into this dark space lush with greenery, we felt the true magic of this trail. We were beneath a high bluff with a constant trickle of water coming down and pooling below, the pools reflecting the huge trees rising from the forest floor – perhaps old-growth specimens. We also found some rockworks, the remnant of earlier white settlers.

Floor of the hollow at Hideout Hollow
Floor of the hollow at Hideout Hollow

It was an easy hike, with a little challenge if you want to climb down into the deep part of the hollow. Click here for directions and a map: http://www.nps.gov/buff/planyourvisit/upload/HOH_Complete.pdf

After our hike we drove back in to Compton to grab a bite to eat at JB Trading Company (www.jbtradingco.com). We were too late for anything from the grill but they had great sandwiches which they made up fresh for us. As I waited for our sandwiches I browsed the shelves of outdoor gear and came across a couple of recent issues of Overland Journal (www.overlandjournal.com). Lo and behold, there was the one with Bill’s “Beemers and Black Diamonds” story in it. Bill showed it to the girl at the counter and autographed it. You never know where you will find an Overland Journal!

Bill autographs
Bill autographs “Beemers and Black Diamonds”
Overland  Journal is everywhere!
Overland Journal is everywhere!

Friday, May 1, 2015

The next day – actually the day of our anniversary, Friday, May 1 — we had a lazy morning then went to hike Hemmed-In Hollow, another trail near our cabin. http://www.nps.gov/buff/planyourvisit/upload/HemHol_Complete.pdf

It is a five-mile round trip from the trailhead to the Hemmed-In Hollow falls. Depending on your source, this falls is 177 feet, 210 feet, or 250 feet high, making it the highest waterfall between the Rockies and the Appalachians.

The falls at Hemmed-In Hollow
The falls at Hemmed-In Hollow

The hike in was a steep downhill, making the hike out a difficult climb. Take lots of water on this trail, especially if you are doing it on a warm day. If you are not in good shape, don’t attempt it, the climb out is too strenuous.

Bill hiking down the steep Hemmed-In Hollow Trail
Bill hiking down the steep Hemmed-In Hollow Trail
A very appropriate message carved into one of the large beech trees on the Hemmed-In Hollow trail
A very appropriate message carved into one of the large beech trees on the Hemmed-In Hollow trail

The views were spectacular as we descended into the hollow, with several good camping spots at scenic vistas. We reached the falls after a fairly brisk walk down the hillside and then climbed up on the sandstone walls of the hollow and crossed behind the falls to the other side.

This place looks more like Utah than Arkansas! While we were there, numerous visitors walked up from the river. After we explored the falls area we walked to the river and ate a sandwich, watching the canoers and kayakers go by, many of them stopping for the hike up to the falls.

Bill exploring the cliffs beneath Hemmed-In Hollow falls
Bill exploring the cliffs beneath Hemmed-In Hollow falls

After the hike, which ended up being nearly seven miles with the river trail extension, we headed over the twisty roads to Ponca and the nearby Steel Creek Campground to scope out the location for the next morning’s photo workshop. We went on from there to Jasper and drove south on scenic Highway 7 to the Cliff House (www.cliffhouseinnar.com). We had a lovely anniversary dinner with a beautiful view of the Buffalo River Valley aka “Arkansas Grand Canyon.”

On the veranda at the Cliff House, overlooking the
On the veranda at the Cliff House, overlooking the “Grand Canyon of Arkansas”

The next morning we were to meet at 6 a.m. for the workshop and it was about a 30-minute drive, so we made an early night of it.

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Tim Ernst coaches Bill and Amanda Winn along Steel Creek
Tim Ernst coaches Bill and Amanda Winn along Steel Creek

Bill and I arrived a little before 6 a.m. to the designated meeting spot (http://www.nps.gov/buff/planyourvisit/upload/Steel-Creek-Campground.pdf) and there was Tim Ernst, a tall, lanky bearded fellow in a hat, talking with two other men. I consider Tim a legend – author of THE guidebooks for the Ouachita Trail and the Ozark Highlands Trail and founder of the Ozark Highlands Trail Association. He has had a huge influence on the outdoor community, and his photography is exceptional. The opportunity to meet him and learn from him was a thrill for me.

Tim was easygoing and helpful. As we got to know the other students, we realized we had connections with two of them. Ron Harris is the brother-in-law of friends of ours from Norman – Bruce and Marilyn Naylor – and Amanda Winn went to high school with my son Mark and his wife Jessica. There were six students in all, so for such a small group that’s a lot of connections. Once we were all there and our cameras set up properly, Tim led us to the creek and we waded in and started shooting. He coached each of us through the shoot and after several hours when we all felt that we had something worth printing, we loaded back in our cars and caravanned to Tim’s Cloudland Gallery on Cave Mountain, south of Boxley. After some orientation, we walked over to Tim’s mountaintop cabin where his gracious wife Pam served us a barbeque lunch. We ate on the porch, visited, and admired the view out over the Buffalo River Valley.

After lunch, we spent the rest of the afternoon reviewing, selecting, and watching Tim edit our photos. Each of us was able to take home a print of one of the photos we shot. Here’s mine:

Dawn on the Buffalo
Dawn on the Buffalo

Bill and I got Pam to take a photo of us with Tim and then we were on our way. The nearest restaurant was the Low Gap Café and we stopped there for a meal. It’s an unusual place, to say the least. Not what you expect to find in that part of Arkansas but considering it’s near a major put-in for canoers and kayakers on the Buffalo, its resort community vibe makes sense. Great food! Here’s an article on it that provides more information: http://www.aecc.com/sites/aecc.com/files/ALJuly2012_letseat.pdf

Susan and Bill with Tim Ernst at the end of our workshop day
Susan and Bill with Tim Ernst at the end of our workshop day

Sunday, May 3, 2015

We were in no hurry to get home, but today we would have to leave. One more hike, and that would be at Lost Valley. http://www.nps.gov/buff/planyourvisit/upload/Lost-Valley_Complete.pdf

Ferns at Lost Valley
Ferns at Lost Valley

The trailhead is near Boxley and there were a few cars there when we arrived. By the time we left, the parking lot was nearly full. This is an easy and obviously very popular trail of about 2.3 miles round trip. The highlight is Eden Falls and the cave above it.

Eden Falls
Eden Falls

Our fellow photography student Amanda Winn and her family were there and we enjoyed meeting her husband and sons. We visited the cave (I had brought my headlamp), squeezing all the way back – 50 yards, perhaps – to a 35-foot waterfall at the cavern’s end.

Catalpa Cafe
Catalpa Cafe

Winding our way home on back roads, we stopped for a late lunch at the Catalpa Café – literally the end of the road east of Oark, on Highway 215. (https://www.facebook.com/CatalpaCafe?fref=ts) Turns out the new owner of the café’ is a Californian with Arkansas roots who bought the business two years ago. The food was far different from what we expected (in a good way) and is worth a side trip.

Embarking on Low Bridge Road as we head home
Embarking on Low Bridge Road as we head home

Eventually we ran out of dirt roads and launched onto I-40 for the long, straight trip home.

Seventy Per Cent

Deb, Mary and Pam at the Highway 298 Trailhead
Deb, Mary and Pam at the Highway 298 Trailhead

Seventy per cent. More or less.

We have now completed seven of 10 sections of the Ouachita Trail (OT) and have the end in sight. My good friend Mary McDaniel and I are section hiking the 223-mile national recreation trail, an effort we began in April of 2011. It’s hard to believe we’ve been at it for four years. We hike spring and fall – the “shoulder seasons” but truly the prime time for hiking in the South Central United States. Summer hiking is something we generally avoid because of the undergrowth – including a great deal of poison ivy – and the insects, especially those nasty ticks. We have completed a section of the OT each spring and fall since we began, except for those years when we had other priorities – the Eagle Rock Loop one year, and my trip to Nepal trekking to Mount Everest Base Camp another.

Last weekend (April 17 and 18, 2015) we hiked the 21.6 miles of Section 7, with hiking buddies Deb Cox and Pam Frank, who have hiked several other sections with us. This time we used the current edition (#5) of Tim Ernst’s Ouachita Trail Guide. When we hiked Section 4 in the fall of 2014, a re-route had occurred and we experienced difficulties created by failing to have the latest trail guide. In other words, we went around in circles.

Section 7 was well marked and well maintained, thanks to the Friends of the Ouachita Trail, and we had no problem staying on track. We began at a trailhead on Highway 298, 11 miles east of Story, Arkansas. Rain had been forecast for the weekend but by 2 p.m. on Friday, April 17, it had not begun and it appeared we would have dry weather for hiking that day. In the first eight miles we gained over 1,000 feet of elevation as we ascended to Ouachita Pinnacle, at 1,961 feet the highest point on the trail since Fourche Mountain, and the highest point for the remainder of the trail. All downhill from there? Not exactly. Over the next two days we would experience nearly 4,200 feet of total elevation gain. LOTS of ups and downs! And warm, humid weather, making the climbing a bit more of an effort.

Pam and Deb setting up camp
Pam and Deb setting up camp
Blocker Creek at twilight
Blocker Creek at twilight

On Friday, we hiked nearly 10 miles and camped at Blocker Creek, a beautiful stream near the trail. The creek banks were steep but we found a nearly flat spot – apparently created by a road grader at some point — where we set up all four tents for the night. That day near Blue Mountain Shelter we had met another hiker – the first we had come across in all of our hiking on the OT.  He said he was hiking from Highway 7 to Highway 27 (east to west) and that he was “Wayne from West Virginia” but his trail name was “Teriyaki.” I made sure we got a photo with him since at the time it seemed like a singular event. He seemed a little skittish about being photographed.

Deb, Pam and Susan with
Deb, Pam and Susan with “Teriyaki”

The next morning we got on the trail around 8 a.m., unsure whether we would try to finish the trail that day or camp at Moonshine Shelter, about 10 miles from our starting point. Again we had mostly dry weather and it was one of the most beautiful sections of trail we have seen, with dogwoods blooming in the forest, clear streams running down from the mountain, and trees leafing out in that lovely spring green, colors made more lush by the morning fog and overcast skies. Along with the beauty of springtime, we experienced an abundance of knee-high poison ivy and a few ticks. It is already nearly too late in the year to be out on the trail.

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A foggy start on Day Two
A foggy start on Day Two
Deb, Pam and Mary talk with through-hiker Jay from Boston near the Big Bear Shelter
Deb, Pam and Mary talk with through-hiker Jay from Boston near the Big Bear Shelter
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The only wildlife we saw on the trail
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Creek near Big Bear Shelter
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A bedraggled wild iris — apparently suffering the effects of run-offs from recent rains
A beautiful vista from the ridgeline
A beautiful vista from the ridgeline
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There were some very large blossoms on some of the dogwood trees
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Near the trail’s end

As we approached Big Bear Shelter we were surprised to spy another hiker sitting on a bridge, and we stopped to talk with him. He was from Boston, through-hiking the trail east to west. He said he was having some trouble with his feet because of all the wet weather and not being able to get his feet dried out. We didn’t get his name but later saw a post from another through-hiker who mentioned meeting Jay from Boston on the trail a few days before we met up with him. Must be the same fellow.

We ended up finishing the trail, about another 12 miles, by 4:15 that day, the last mile hiking in the downpour we had escaped the first 20 or so miles. Knowing we were so close to the end made getting drenched something of a pleasure, although I was anxious to get into dry clothes shortly after! The terminus of this section is a few miles north of Jessieville on Highway 7.

Now, just three more sections . . . but they will have to wait for 2016 because we are planning to hike the first half of the Ozark Highlands Trail in the fall of 2015!

Iceland!

Trek Iceland Photo
Trek Iceland Photo

Iceland — “An under-populated island marooned near the top of the globe, Iceland is, literally, a country in the making. It’s a vast volcanic laboratory where mighty forces shape the earth: geysers gush, mudpots gloop, ice-covered volcanoes rumble and glaciers grind great pathways through the mountains. Its supercharged splendour seems designed to remind visitors of their utter insignificance in the greater scheme of things. And it works a treat: some crisp clean air, an eyeful of the cinematic landscapes, and everyone is transfixed.”

Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/iceland#ixzz3WjUdllX2

And I am going there to trek the scenic beauty of its trails, from Landmannalaugar to Thorsmörk and Fimmvörduháls Volcano!

http://www.trek.is/en/home/laugavegur-trek/laugavegur-trekking-and-fimmvorduhals

I am joining a group that includes our friend and fellow adventurer from Idaho, Joan Whitacre, departing August 15 for Reykjavik, and will be trekking for 6 days. What an opportunity!